I’ve become well acquainted with farmers’ markets over the course of the last few years, making it my weekly mission to pick up some local bounty. But the thought of incorporating some of my goods into a beautiful arrangement never really occurred to me. One peek through the gallery, however, and you can consider me convinced. Captured by Erin McGinn and designed by Greenlion Design, be sure to grab all of the tips and tricks below!

From Erin McGinn… Thinking about the rich and vibrant colors right now in New England, Kim Lamothe of Greenlion Design and I decided to photograph a floral piece that could be created from elements discovered at your local farmers market. Being ever inspired by local and sustainable produce for their events, Longwood Venues and Destinations’ Director of Sales and Marketing, Nichole Wardle, invited us photograph the piece in the Island House at Belle Mer.

From Kim at Greenlion Design… Early fall is one of the best times to pop by your local farmers market, and not just for the plentiful fresh produce, but also for thinking outside the box to create a statement floral design. Choosing beautiful and colorful flowers and complimentary fruits and veggies to use in the design makes a fun and lush piece that you can break down and repurpose after your dinner party. Here I chose inclusions like purple eggplant, champagne grapes, and plums along with locally grown bibb lettuce and live herb plants to use in this piece. By keeping things like herbs and lavender in their small pots inside the larger vessel, they provide a great fill and base on the sides of your floral frog, but also can be removed and planted in your garden afterwards.

Farmers’ Market Floral Design Tips

1) Consider incorporation fruits and veggies into your arangements. Think purple eggplant, champagne grapes, plums, lettuce and herbs.

2) Pick immature fruits and vegetables, they make inserting a small wooden pic on to them easy, and the pic will not move or slip. Slice the bottom of your wooden pic with felco’s to easily insert into your floral frog.

3) Place your frog in a smaller container filled with water ( think yogurt container) so you can place live plants around that.

4) Don’t have a floral frog? Use a tape grid on top of the smaller container you are going to put your frog in.

5) Plant the herbs in your garden or send home with dinner party friends.

Photography: Erin McGinn | Floral Design: Greenlion Design | Location: Belle Mer

Greenlion Design is a member of our Little Black Book. Find out how members are chosen by visiting our FAQ page.
Greenlion Design

VIEW PORTFOLIO